This Choir Sings Carols

This Choir Sings Carols

This Choir Sings Carols

Once a year, in early October, around 60 people gather at the City of Whittlesea’s Fountain View Room in the northern fringes of Melbourne to begin 10 weeks of rehearsal for a single concert.

In Melbourne’s northern fringe a filmmaker, a photographer and a media artist came mentored a small production team of aspirant filmmakers, members of First Impressions Youth Theatre. With a mix of amateur and semi-professional equipment they made a film about a choir that only sings songs about Christmas, a choir comprised of people of all ages, faiths and origins.

This Choir Sings Carols is a production of Secession Films in collaboration with First Impressions Youth Theatre produced with the support of Culture and Development, City of Whittlesea and the Australian Cultural Fund.

The producers of this film recognise the rich Aboriginal heritage of this country and acknowledge the Wurundjeri Wilam clan as the traditional owners of the land we had filmed upon.
Duration: 25 mins
Completed: July 2018

Crew

  • Writer / Director / Editor – Andrew Garton
  • Mentors – Andrew Garton, Katherine O’Donnell, Matthew Berka
  • Cameras – Ruwanthi Wijetunga, Aron Raward, Kasey Gardner, Ben Chapman, Tenielle Reid, Matthew Berka, Katherine O’Donnell, Andrew Garton
  • Interviewers – Aron Raward, Ruwanthi Wijetunga, Tenielle Reid, Kasey Gardner

Acknowledgments

Filmed at City of Whittlesea’s Fountain View Room and Redleap Reserve, Mill Park, Victoria, Australia.

With thanks to the City of Whittlesea, Westfield Plenty Valley and Harcourts Real Estate.

Produced with the support of Community and Cultural Development, City of Whittlesea and the Australian Cultural Fund.

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Stupendous

Stupendous

Stupendous

Stupendous is a short film that describes through movement and observation a group of dancers who ready themselves for a thirty-second performance they will make within, what appears to be an empty theatre. Each of the dancers lives with Parkinson’s Disease.

Produced by Katrina Rank and Paris Wages in collaboration with Andrew Garton.

Dur: 7 mins
More info: Stupendous Website

Ocean in a Drop

Ocean in a Drop

OCEAN IN A DROP

India’s invisible majority are poor yet literate in their own traditions and increasingly online. Ocean in a Drop is a film about these emergent online populations told by rural women and children, artisans and entrepreneurs. Shot in 2015 the filmmakers visited fourteen villages throughout nine districts across Rajasthan, Madhya Pradesh and Bihar.

A film by Andrew Garton in collaboration with the Digital Empowerment Foundation and INOMY Media and in association with the Internet SocietyAustralia India Institute and the Association for Progressive Communications. Ocean in a Drop is a production of Secession/Films.

Production commenced January 2015. Ocean in a Drop was completed February 2017 and screened on the Indian national broadcaster, DD1, in 2018. The film is accompanied by the book, Right to Know – India’s internet avantgarde, a soundtrack album. An eight-part web series, Right to Know, was commissioned by the Association for Progressive Communications and released in 2018.

Duration: 75 mins
Completed: 22 February 2017

Crew

  • Writer / Director – Andrew Garton
  • Director of Photography – Jary Nemo
  • Second unit camera – Rohit Dhall
  • Design – Cathy Chen
  • Media and Translations – Udita Chaturvedi
  • Translator – Ravi Guria

Resources

Kalua Sarai

Kalua Sarai

Kalua Sarai

Kalua Sarai is a small village surrounded by free-ways within New Dehli’s dense suburbs. Shot from a five-story roof-top this short ‘ambient’ film observes the silent minutia of the village winding down of a night.

Filmed in Kalua Sarai, New Dehli, India from February to April 2015.

A film by Andrew Garton and Jary Nemo.

Acknowledgements – Digital Empowerment Foundation and Auspicious Arts.

Well Bread

Well Bread

Well Bread

On a cheerful August day in 2014 around 150 people from The City of Whittlesea’s multicultural community gathered at the Barry Road Community Activity Centre in Lalor. They came to share culinary skills, stories and revel in the distinctive aroma of freshly made bread.

 

 

Book a community screening in Australia

Community screenings are a great way to share the experience of watching new films with small groups within intimate settings. It’s also a way to stimulate discussion about the topics explored in the film. Where possible resource materials can be provided and if I can get there, organise a Q&A with the Director.

License fees
  • Small (Up to 75 people):              $50 + shipping
  • Large (Over 75 people):               $100 + shipping
  • Director’s appearance:                Fee and travel costs available on request
Shipping costs include a screening version on DVD or thumb-drive if a download screener is not available.
All screening license fees are put towards the completion of Forged from Fire – the making of The Blacksmiths’ Tree.
Email or call me to discuss your screening event and the kind of support I might able to provide.

Crew

  • Director, Editor – Andrew Garton
  • Director of Photography, Grade MIKE WILKINSPresented by the City of Whittlesea in partnership with the Whittlesea Community Leadership Network.

Duration:  14 Mins, 30 Secs
Completed: October 2014

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